Sunday, 19 October 2014

Happy fortieth birthday to Marvel UK's Planet of the Apes and Dracula Lives!

Marvel UK Dracula Lives #1
Marvel UK Planet of the Apes #1

Thanks to Colin Jones for pointing out that this is a very special week indeed for all British comics fans.

For it was forty years ago this week that Marvel UK unleashed two new mags on an unsuspecting public.

One of those mags was Planet of the Apes and the other was Dracula Lives.

Of the two comics, it would have seemed reasonable to assume that it'd be Dracula Lives that would have the longer shelf life, seeing as Planet of the Apes was launched purely to cash in on a TV show that failed to catch light so badly that it only managed to run for a few months before never being seen again.

On the other hand, Dracula Lives was built around classic characters who'd proven their staying power by already having had a long and distinguished career long before the comic had even been conceived.

But how wrong we'd have been in such an assumption. Dracula Lives was finally staked through the heart with issue #87, being forced to merge with its sister title, whilst Planet of the Apes held on for a walloping one hundred and twenty three issues before merging with Mighty World of Marvel where such simian adventures never quite fitted in with the likes of the Hulk, Daredevil and Captain Marvel.

Bearing in mind that Marv Wolfman and Gene Colan's Dracula tales were nearly always more compelling than Marvel's ape-based fare, I can only assume that Dracula Lives' shorter lifespan was down to the fact that its back-up strips - featuring the likes of Frankenstein and Werewolf by Night - were noticeably weaker than such Planet of the Apes' backup strips as Ka-Zar, the Black Panther and Adam Warlock.

Or perhaps, by the 1970s, such traditional horror characters were merely seen as being too corny to live.

Whatever the reason, while I had every issue ever published of Planet of the Apes, I think I only ever had two issues of Dracula Lives, one of which I recall reading whilst stood just inside the entrance of Pauldins department store in Sheffield city centre.

Sadly, like Planet of the Apes and Dracula Lives, Pauldins is no more. A grim reminder that, like the king of the vampires, ultimately everything in life will one day be reduced to dust.

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

The Doctor Who Monster Book.

Doctor Who Monster Book, Chris Achilleos
Forget Spider-Man. If you have any sense at all, there's only one thing in this world that you want to see stuck to the side of a building.

And that's a police box.

Reader, in 1977, I saw that police box. It was stuck to the side of a building in Blackpool, Lancashire, England, Britain, Europe, the Earth.

Inside that police box was not a policeman. It was an exhibition.

It was a Doctor Who Exhibition. An exhibition that could only be accessed by entering that box and then descending a flight of stairs, into a basement.

Within that basement were many things.

There was a Dalek threatening you as you arrived.

There was a Sea Devil pointing its deadly round thing at you.

There were yet more Daleks, roaming around on rails, doing yet more threatening.

On the walls were stills from the making of the show, including the story The Talons of Weng-Chiang. How all visitors must have gasped at the site of ex-jungle-brawler Leela being nibbled on by a giant rat.

Most important of all to this story, there was a shop. And that shop sold only things related to the universe's greatest Time Lord.

From that shop, I got The Doctor Who Monster Book, a staple-bound book filled with articles about the Doctor's greatest enemies. In its centre was a poster by Chris Achilleos, the man who did all those covers for the show's epic Target novelisations.

In the modern age, none of this might seem that exciting but, in the dark days of the 1970s, when the internet didn't yet exist and old episodes couldn't be found on videotape, a book filled with photos of the show's greatest menaces was a Godsend. At last I could be reacquainted with the monsters I recalled from years gone by and I could meet other monsters I had no memory of at all.

There was a Giant Robot. There was a Zygon. There were hordes of Daleks on Westminster Bridge and a Mechanoid doing whatever it was Mechanoids did. Most intriguingly of all, there were the Zarbi, man-sized ants with human legs. What terrible powers of evolution had combined to create such a creature? Truly, this was the greatest book ever published.

I accept that this site is called Steve Does Comics and that that book was not a comic. But I don't care. Some things are so awesome they have to be shared with the world. Even things that aren't comics.

And if you fear it's too much to ask of flesh and blood to endure a post about a book on a comics site, just thank Rassilon I didn't do a post about the picture cards I used to get from boxes of tea. Now there is a post I'm saving up for when I have nothing at all else left to write about.

Sunday, 12 October 2014

Son of Satan comics I have owned.

One of the banes of my late father's life was that when he'd saunter on to the local shops, the local madwoman would often suddenly point at him in the street and shout out for all the world to hear, "It's him! It's Satan! He walks among us!"

This could explain why I've always had a soft spot for the Son of Satan. After all, if a back-story like that doesn't make him a kindred spirit, then what would?

And that can mean only one thing.

It's time for me to look at the Son of Satan comics I had when I was barely more than an imp.


Marvel Spotlight #12, The Son of Satan

It's our anti-hero's first appearance, as he goes to Hell to retrieve the soul of Johnny Blaze, in a tale blessed with the tortured looking art of Herb Trimpe.
Marvel Spotlight #13, The Son of Satan

Despite what it claimed on the cover of the previous issue, this is the issue in which we actually get to learn the origin of Daimon Hellstrom and how he got that fancy pitchfork of his.

Apparently, his mother never once suspected she might be married to Satan, despite the fact her husband was called Hellstrom and he insisted on naming their two children, "Daimon," and, "Satana."
Marvel Spotlight #14, The Son of Satan, Ikthalon

Bored with fighting Satan, Daimon branches out and tackles a bunch of ice demons lurking in a college building.
Marvel Spotlight #17, The Son of Satan, Spyros

My memories of this one are vague.

Does it involve time travel and a team-up with Dr Strange to defeat some Steve Gerberesque menace to the cosmos?
Marvel Spotlight #18, The Son of Satan

If I remember right, this is a Gene Colan drawn tale of possession and exorcism.
The Son of Satan #1

The SOS finally gets his own mag.

And he's back off to Hell again after he discovers there's only one thing in life worse than having your house repossessed - and that's having it possessed in the first place.
The Son of Satan #2, The Possessor

My memories of this one are fairly vague. Clearly, it continues the storyline started in the previous issue and gives us the origin of the Possessor, which may or may not have had something to do with a travelling carnival.
The Son of Satan #4

I genuinely have no memory at all of what happens in this issue.

It all looks very dramatic though.

Wednesday, 8 October 2014

Special Marvel Edition #16 - Shang-Chi versus Midnight.

Special Marvel Edition #16, Shang-Chi vs Midnight
Wait!

What's that sound you hear?

Good gravy, it's my mind, swishing through the air at you - sharp as a shuriken!

And, my mind being as sharp as a shuriken, I'll never forget the first time I encountered the word, "Ninja."

It was in the pages of Special Marvel Edition #16.

Or at least in the issue of Marvel UK's Avengers comic that reprinted it.

The tale involves Midnight, who as well as being a master of the martial arts is Shang-Chi's best and only friend.

At least he used to be. Now that Shang-Chi's turned against his father Fu Manchu, fate has decreed that they have to become deadly enemies.

So it is that, acting on Fu's orders, Midnight sets out to kill our plucky hero.

Midnight is not a happy character at the best of times. He has a bit of a Dr Doom complex going on, as he has to hide his face behind a mask, it having been hideously disfigured in childhood during an attack on his village by Fu Manchu's British enemies.

But, unlike Doom, he harbours no plans to conquer the world, being happy just to serve his fiendish master.

Cue page after page of stylish Jim Starlin action as the two martial artists battle it out in the streets of night-time New York, while philosophising at each other.

It's all good moody, beautiful stuff, even if there's maybe a bit too much an obsession with race in its captions and thought bubbles. And Midnight without his cape and hat is drawn purely in black silhouette, giving him the surreal appearance of a shadow brought to life.

Special Marvel Edition #16, Shang-Chi v Midnight
Of course, the tale's main value is that it proves to be a timely warning as to why you should never wear a cape whilst trying to murder someone on a building site.

Reader, it's a warning I plan to take to heart from now on.

The odd thing is that, reading this tale again for the first time since I was a youth, there's no mention at all of the word, "Ninja," in it.

It seems I was wrong and that I shall forget the first time I ever heard the word.

Because, whenever it was, it clearly wasn't here.

Special Marvel Edition #16, Midnight

Sunday, 5 October 2014

Supergirl #10 - Part Two: Her Brother's Keeper.

Supergirl #10, Her brother
It's been a mammoth journey but at last I've done it. I've reached the end of my reviews of Supergirl's ten issue 1970s run of her own title.

As I'm sure you've guessed, Supergirl issue #10 features not one but two tales of the maid of might. I reviewed the first story last week - and here's where I fling myself headlong into the second.

What happens is this.

A mad scientist decides to make a clone of Supergirl, so he can get it to commit crimes on his behalf.

Clearly he's not as clever as he thinks he is because, when it emerges from his machine, the clone has somehow been created as a somewhat inane male. Think of him as Justin Bieber but not as evil.

Not that our mad scientist cares about that. All he cares about is sending the super clone out to rob a bank.

Supergirl #10
Needless to say, it's not long before Supergirl is on the trail.

But, when she confronts him at his lab, the scientist orders the clone to kill her.

Supergirl tells it not to.

Torn between wanting to obey its creator and not wanting to kill Supergirl, the clone comes up with a happy compromise and instead blows his own brains out with a gun.

Well, there's a turn-up for the books. The idea of someone creating a copy of Supergirl to commit crimes with is hardly groundbreaking for the strip but the idea of the tale finishing with a character blowing his own brains out with a gun is totally at odds with the light and frothy feel we've come to associate with the title in its ten issue run. Because of this, I approve wholeheartedly.

Supergirl #10, suicide
Sadly that was it for the title. Supergirl's strip was then incorporated into the newly launched Superman Family and Supergirl had to settle for sharing the title with the likes of Jimmy Olsen and Krypto the Superdog.

Despite the general tameness of these ten issues, I do have a soft spot for them. There's a good natured naivete about them that lends them a certain charm and they look nice and Supergirl looks nice.

Therefore, whatever its faults, I declare the 1970s solo Supergirl comic to be a good thing.

Having said that, I'm glad I don't have to read any more of them.

Saturday, 4 October 2014

Forty years ago today - October 1974.

Well, it's been a happy day for me because Dino De Horrendous' legendary 1976 King Kong remake has been on TV this afternoon. How I thrilled. How I gasped. How I wondered how they ever thought they'd get away with that robot ape near the climax.

But were our favourite Marvel heroes feeling like kings of the jungle in this month of exactly forty years ago?

Or were they just being made monkeys of?

Avengers #128, Necrodamus

Thanks to Agatha Harkness, the Scarlet Witch finds herself up against the terrifying menace of Necrodamus.

To be honest, I can't see the name, "Necrodamus," without thinking of the reggae duo Chaka Demus and Pliers, which does undermine the sense of menace somewhat.

You can read my review of this very issue, right here.
Conan the Barbarian #43, Red Sonja

Red Sonja is back - and on her back - as our favourite tomb raiders find themselves up against a naughty pair of sorcerers.

You can read my review of this issue, right here.
Captain America and the Falcon #178

You can't read my review of this issue anywhere - because I've no idea what happens in it. But the cover has strong hints of the Smasher story-line from the Amazing Spider-Man.
Daredevil and the Black Widow #114, Man-Thing

DD finds himself up against the menace of Death-Stalker and the Gladiator in the Everglades.

I remember first reading this one in the Mighty World of Marvel 1977 annual.

And you can read my review of that annual, right here.
Fantastic Four #151, Thundra

Is this the one where Thundra makes her debut?

Obviously, I could have asked, "Is this the one where Mahkizmo makes his debut?" but he's lumbered with a name like, "Mahkizmo," which makes me not care so much about when he made his debut.
Hulk #180, the Wendigo

The Wendigo's back.

And, unless my memory fails me, a certain future X-Man is about to make his debut.
Amazing Spider-Man #137, Green Goblin

Harry Osborn's still being the Green Goblin.
Thor #228

I genuinely know nothing at all about this issue but my razor-sharp senses tell me Ego may be involved.
X-Men #90, Professor X is dead

"Not a Hoax! Not a dream! Not an imaginary tale!"

I could be wrong but doesn't it turn out that it is a hoax and Professor X is really alive and well and choosing to live in the cellar for about five years?

You can't blame him, We've all done it.

Thursday, 2 October 2014

Fifty years ago this month - October 1964.

The mighty octopus; the only creature on Earth so awesome it has a month named after it.

But what were our favourite Marvel heroes doing in the Month of the Octopus exactly fifty years ago?

Were they receiving a hearty kick in the tentacles?

Or were they busy making suckers of their enemies?

Avengers #9, Wonder Man

How little did Marvel know the wheels they were setting in motion when they introduced us to Wonder Man.
Daredevil #4, The Purple Man

The Purple Man. Possibly the greatest super-villain name since Paste-Pot Pete.
Fantastic Four #31, The Mole Man

It's the return of the Mole Man. If only it were Tyrannus.

Why is it never Tyrannus?
Journey into Mystery #109, Thor v Magneto

That rare thing, a fight between Thor and Magneto.

Good to see the rest of the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants looking as enthusiastic as ever.
Amazing Spider-Man #17, Human Torch and the Green Goblin

Is this the one that introduced the world to the Spider-Man Fan Club?
Strange Tales #125, The Thing, Hmman Torch and Sub-Mariner

Subby shows up to try and introduce some drama into the adventures of the Thing and the Human Torch.

I wonder what the Dr Strange story was?
Tales of Suspense #58, Iron Man v Captain America

It's one of my favourite early Iron Man tales, as the Chameleon throws a star-spangled spanner in the works and pits Cap Am against the golden grappler.
Tales to Astonish #60, Giant-Man and The Hulk

The Hulk finally gets his own strip back.

Will Giant-Man be able to see off this challenge to his Tales to Astonish dominance?

Sadly, I fear we can all guess the answer to that one.

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