Thursday 31 March 2022

March 31st 1982 - Marvel UK, 40 years ago this week.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

Some might say it was airplanes killed the beast but some would claim it was beauty did the job.

Trouble is, it turned out there was more than one beast.

It's true. By some means never explored, King Kong had a son.

And I know that because, this afternoon in 1982, BBC One was showing Son of Kong, the oft-neglected but, no doubt, charming sequel to the more celebrated original.

Not that they cared about that in Canada. For, that week, they were too busy doing the independence thing, as Royal Assent was given to The Canada Act 1982. A deed which set the stage for the repatriation of the Canadian Constitution.

Incredible Hulk #1, Marvel UK March 1982

Hooray! The Hulk's back - with a brand new comic!

Granted, it's not that new. The issue's mostly devoted to a reprint of that Herb Trimpe drawn tale in which the green gallivanter tackles the Evil Inhumans after they take over a Central American republic, with their giant hypno-bot.

Needless to say, Hulkie soon disposes of that particular menace.

We also get the tale that deals with the question of what would have happened had Wolverine killed the Hulk during their first encounter.

And, of course, because it's a first issue, there's a free gift.

In this case, it's a three-legged cardboard hulk that you can make run around the carpet, by pushing it, provided you attach a lollipop stick, to reinforce it.

We also get a free Hulk poster, recycled from a cover of the Hulk's previous Marvel UK comic.

Super Spider-Man TV Comic #473, the Foolkiller

I do believe it's the one in which Peter Parker befriends a new student at ESU.

Only for him to discover he's the latest incarnation of the Fookiller!

Needless to say, he turns out to be as foolish and destructive as the previous one was.

But the Foolkiller may not be the only one who needs to wake up and smell the coffee. And so, there's the chance for us to win a cassette/radio alarm clock.

And we get a puzzle poster.

We also get a TV programme guide. I'm assuming that relates to the Spider-Man television show, rather than being a general TV listings guide, though I can't guarantee it.

Captain America #58, Marvel UK

I do believe we're being offered the tale in which Steve Rogers' elderly neighbor decides to kill a nearby Nazi. Now what's Steve going to do?

I suspect he's going to try and stop her.

This comic, too, gives us an opportunity to win a cassette/radio alarm clock.

But just what Thor and Iron Man are up to while this is all going on, I cannot say.

Scooby-Doo and his TV Friends #6, Marvel UK

It's yet another issue of Scooby-Doo and his TV Friends for which I've been able to gather no intelligence. Not even a front cover.

This time, it's issue #6, which I'm sure is the best one yet!

Tuesday 29 March 2022

Speak Your Brain! Part XXIV. The first album you regretted buying?

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***
The Steve Does Comics Megaphone
Image by Tumisu
from Pixabay

Hark! What's that sound?

It's the sound of yet another month making ready to fall off its perch and give way to a whole new one.

And what will that new month bring?

No one knows.

And what will this post bring?

Even fewer can know.

That's because it's time, once more, to activate the feature that's got the whole internet talking. It's the one in which the first person to comment below gets to decide what all the rest of us get to comment below.

It could encompass sport, art, films, books, cooks, nooks, rocks, music, mucous, fairy tales, fairy lights, Fairy Liquid, fairy cakes, Eccles cakes, myth, moths, maths, magic, tragedy, comedy, murder, mystery, mayhem, May Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Doris Day, Marvin Gaye, the Equinox, sofas, sodas, sausages, eggs, whisky, broth, Bath, baths, Garth Marenghi, Garth Brooks, Garth Crooks, Bruno Brookes, Bruno Mars, Mars Bars, wine bars, flip-flops, flim-flam, flapjacks, see-saws, jigsaws, dominoes, dunderheads, flowerpots, flour pots, bread bins, bin bags, body bags, body horror, doggy bags, bean bags, coal sacks, cola, cocoa, pancakes, pizzas, baking soda, sci-fi, Wi-Fi, Hi-Fi, sewage, saunas, suet, Silurians, Sontarans, sins, suns, sans, sense, sludge or sandcastles.

It could encompass something else altogether.

Only you can decide.

Sunday 27 March 2022

The most forgettable comics I've ever owned - Part 23: Quasimodo's Monster Magazine.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

Quasimodo's Monster Magazine #4
He always claimed it was the bells that drove him mad but I reckon it was editing a magazine.

It's true. In the mid-1970s, the world's most famous resident of Notre Dame had a dramatic career shift and, with the backing of Mayfair Publications, launched his very own journal dedicated to monsters.

Of course, I only know this for one reason.

Dumb luck.

That's because, while researching my Marvel UK post for the first week of April, I accidentally came across the front cover I've reproduced to the top left of this post.

And I recognised it at once.

For, dear reader, I once owned that magazine.

The strange thing, though, is that, up until that moment, I'd totally forgotten I did.

I had, however, remembered reading its articles, which covered such subjects as Space: 1999, the films of Roger Corman and the story of Lon Chaney Junior.

However, I'd been completely wrong about where I'd read them. You see, I'd always recalled having encountered them in the pages of Atlas Seaboard's Movie Monsters mag which lasted just four issues before disappearing.

As it turned out, Quasimodo did a better job of things than whoever'd managed that publication, as his series proved slightly more successful, lasting for at least eight issues before biting the bullet in a run stretching from January 1975 to May 1976

Quasimodo's Monster Magazine #6
But that wasn't all. Conducting further research led me to discover I also had issue #6, which lent us information about the history of Hammer Studios, Star Trek, cinema's Carradine family and the life and career of Boris Karloff.

How could I have forgotten the existence of these books?

I've no idea.

Especially as, if we played our cards right, we could have won the cover paintings. Although, to be honest, I'm not sure I'd want the one for issue #6 which isn't great.

I must confess it's a bit of a cheat to post this in a slot dedicated to the most forgettable comics I've ever owned, as Quasimodo's Monster Magazine wasn't a comic, although later issues did feature a seeming plethora of comic strips.

But I have nowhere else to put it. So, here it shall reside, remembered, at last, as it deserves to be.

Thursday 24 March 2022

March 24th 1982 - Marvel UK, 40 years ago this week.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

In these times of conflict in Europe, it's always reassuring to know there are certain things that can unite the continent.

One of those is the Eurovision Song Contest.

Granted, it mostly unites Europe in a stampede to award the British entry zero points but, still, that's at least some kind of accord.

And so it was that, on this very night in 1982, BBC One was broadcasting A Song For Europe, the event at which the nation got to choose its entry for that year's competition.

I can exclusively reveal the nation's choice on that evening was Bardo's One Step Closer which bore a more-than-passing resemblance to Manfred Mann's version of Blinded by the Light.

No one, after all, ever accused Eurovision of originality.

Sadly, Bardo were destined not to go on to win the main contest. That was won, as I recall, by German teenager Nicole with her lovely song A Little Peace.

Elsewhere, that week, it was all getting heated in the nation's theatres, as a court case brought by "decency" campaigner Mary Whitehouse, against the National Theatre of Britain for its production The Romans in Britain, ended when the Attorney General dismissed proceedings after it became clear her expert eyewitness had been sat too far away from the stage to have clearly seen the body part he claimed to have seen.

In the South Atlantic, that week, Argentine scrap metal workers raised their national flag on South Georgia in the Falkland Islands and set off a whole heap of trouble.

Over on the UK singles chart, Tight Fit finally lost their Number One spot. They lost it to the equally non-credible Seven Tears by the Goombay Dance Band, a song which bore no resemblance at all to Auld Lang Syne.

On the album chart, Barbra Streisand's Love Songs reclaimed pole position from the Jam's The Gift.

Super Spider-Man TV Comic #472, The Vulture

As you've probably guessed from the cover, this issue features the tale in which the Vulture has given up on life until he meets Aunt May's boyfriend whose positivity inspires him to return to a career of crime.

Oops.

We also get to see a selection of the readers' drawings.

And we get the chance to win a fabulous work of art.

I don't have a clue what that work of art is.

I suspect it's not one of the readers' drawings.

Captain America #57, Marvel UK

We also get to see readers' pencillings in this one. I don't know if they're the same drawings that appear in the Spider-Man book or if they're a totally different set.

I can say, though, that Cap's still battling the robotic horror that is Adonis.

Of Thor and Iron Man, I can say little.

But I do know this book also gives us the chance to win a fabulous work of art.

Scooby-Doo and his TV Friends #5

In a shocking development that will shock no one, information about Scooby-Doo and his TV Friends #5 is hard to find on the internet. Thanks to eagle-eyed reader McScotty, however, the cover has been unearthed. And it's this one.

I can reveal little of the contents, although, it being Scooby-Doo, I suspect we can guess at what they may be like.

And, if that's not enough to keep us happy, we can at least console ourselves with the fact that, this issue, we can win the Worzel Gummidge annual of which we've always dreamt.

Tuesday 22 March 2022

Speak Your Brain! Part XXIII. Ventures beyond your comfort zone

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***
The Steve Does Comics Megaphone
Image by Tumisu
from Pixabay

Free speech reigns supreme, once more, as we re-encounter the feature in which the first person to comment gets to decide the blazing hot topic of the day.

It could be sport, art, films, books, cooks, nooks, rocks, music, mucous, fairy tales, fairy lights, Fairy Liquid, fairy cakes, Eccles cakes, myth, moths, maths, magic, tragedy, comedy, murder, mystery, mayhem, May Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Doris Day, the Equinox, sofas, sodas, sausages, eggs, whisky, broth, Bath, baths, Garth Marenghi, Garth Brooks, Garth Crooks, Bruno Brookes, Bruno Mars, Mars Bars, wine bars, flip-flops, flim-flam, flapjacks, see-saws, jigsaws, dominoes, flowerpots, flour pots, bread bins, bin bags, body bags, body horror, doggy bags, bean bags, cola, pancakes, pizzas, baking soda, sci-fi, Wi-Fi, Hi-Fi, sewage, saunas, suet, Silurians, Sontarans, sins, suns, sans, sense or sandcastles.

Or something else altogether.

That is entirely up to you.

Sunday 20 March 2022

2000 AD - February 1984.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

Frankie might say, "Relax," but, in February 1984, members of that band were probably too excited to do so.

That's because their song of that name was still hogging the Number One spot on the UK singles chart. The one it had seized control of in the early days of January. 

However, even the Frankies couldn't rule forever. And so it was that on the very last week of the month, they were deposed by a German.

That German was Nena, and her track was 99 Red Balloons, that nuclear apocalypse-fearing song of Captain Kirks, super-heroes and floaty, inflated rubber.

Over on the British album chart, three LPs held sway, that month. They were Touch by 
Eurythmics, Sparkle in The Rain by Simple Minds and Into the Gap by the Thompson Twins. None of which I've ever heard. If ordered to choose one to listen to, I think I'd probably opt for the last of those.

But what of the galaxy's greatest comic? What was it up to at the time?

There would appear to have been nothing too dramatic going on. It was still giving us a diet of Sláine, D.R. & Quinch, Judge Dredd and Strontium Dog, although there was something new, with The Great Infinity Inc. Foul-Up, a strip of which I recall nothing.

Perhaps the most exciting news is that Prog 357 gave us 
the chance to win 100 Judge Dredd games, although I must confess to knowing zilch of what those games entailed.

2000 AD prog 354

2000 AD prog 355, Slaine

2000 AD prog 356, Citizen Snork

2000 AD prog 357, Slaine

Thursday 17 March 2022

March 17th 1982 - Marvel UK, 40 years ago this week.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

When it came to news and current affairs, it was a quiet week, this week in 1982.

And there wasn't much happening on the UK singles chart either, with Tight Fit's The Lion Sleeps Tonight retaining the top spot it had claimed two weeks earlier.

But there was change on the British album chart, thanks to the Jam's final album The Gift smashing in at Number One to make sure the perma-grumpy trio went out in fine style.

And, speaking of style...

Super Spider-Man TV Comic #471, the molten man

It looks like we're getting that tale in which Flash Thompson, Harry Osborn and Liz Allan all make return appearances when the Molten Man blazes his way back into our lives.

Elsewhere, we take a look at Peter Parker's private life, including a plan of his office at ESU. A thing I think we've all been desperate for.

Not only that but, according to the cover, all our questions are answered.

What? All of them? But I have so many. Who put the ram in the ram-a-lam-a-ding-dong? Who put the bop in the bop-shoo-wop-doo-wop? Who put brown owl eyes on a butterfly's wings? Will these questions, which have haunted me all my life, finally be answered?

And what's that? We can win a fabulous space-tech book?

Just what is this book?

And does it possess the means to change our lives?

Captain America #56

And this issue can give us a space-tech book, as well!

But, more importantly than even that, Cap's still up against the maddening menace of Adonis who, if memory serves me well, is some bloke who's transferred his mind into a perfect android body which then gets half-melted, making it look a bit of a state.

Then he drowns in a swamp.

It's really not his day.

I do believe Thor's up against Locus who's some sort of bank clerk who can make geometric shapes appear from thin air and use them as weapons. What chance does even a thunder god have against the power of geometry?

Meanwhile, I'm not sure what Iron Man's up to. I think it might be the story in which Bethany Cabe's best friend gets beaten almost to death by gangsters.

Hanna Barbera's Scooby-Doo and His T.V. Friends #4

Tragically, I can find no information online about Scooby-Doo and His TV Friends issue #4. I can't even find a cover for it

So, a question mark is all I can leave you with.

But what finer way is there to end a post, if not with a question mark?

Tuesday 15 March 2022

Speak Your Brain! Part XXII. The last song or album you were compulsive about.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

The Steve Does Comics Megaphone
Image by Tumisu
from Pixabay
Once more, the people of the world gather by the Celestial Water-Cooler to discuss who-can-know-what because it's one of those Tuesdays on which Sheffield's 38th greatest blog flings the microphone at the public and allows the first person who comments to decide the topic du jour.

But what could it be?

Could it be sport, art, films, books, cooks, nooks, rocks, music, mucous, fairy tales, fairy lights, Fairy Liquid, fairy cakes, Eccles cakes, myth, moths, maths, magic, tragedy, comedy, murder, mystery, mayhem, May Day, Christmas Day, sofas, sodas, sausages, eggs, whisky, broth, Bath, Garth Marenghi, Garth Brooks, Garth Crooks, Bruno Brookes, Bruno Mars, Mars Bars, wine bars, flip-flops, flim-flam, flapjacks, see-saws, flowers, flours, bread bins, bin bags, body bags, doggy bags, bean bags, cola, pancakes, pizzas, baking soda, sci-fi, Wi-Fi, Hi-Fi, horror, honour, sewage, saunas, suet, Silurians, Sontarans, sins, suns, sans or sandcastles?

Yes, it could.

Sunday 13 March 2022

Forty years ago today - March 1982.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

History. It's everywhere you look.

Let's find some.

The Avengers #217

If I remember this one correctly, Hank Pym's trying to turn his life around and make amends for his recent misdeeds but only succeeds in getting himself blackmailed into committing a robbery, by Egghead, after fitting Trish Starr with a homicidal bionic arm.

And, of course, this leads to him having to fight the rest of the Avengers.

Some days, you just can't catch a break.

Conan the Barbarian #132

For reasons I can't recall, Conan enters the Hyborian version of the Olympics and, of course, wins it.

But the other competitors aren't so lucky and fall foul of all manner of death traps, menaces, monsters and cheaters.

Fantastic Four #240, the Inhumans flee Earth

It's an odd outing, as the Inhumans discover they're almost as vulnerable to the modern world's pollutants as Crystal's always been, and the decision's therefore made for them to flee to the moon, where they'll live in its abandoned Blue Area.

And they're taking the entire city of Attilan with them!

As far as I'm aware, no one bothered to ask the Watcher's permission before doing any of this.

The Incredible Hulk #269

It's an issue that pulls a stunt I can never forgive, as it's revealed our hero's adventures in the pages of Rampaging Hulk never happened and were just stories being told by Bereet on her homeworld. Bereet has never even met the Hulk.

Or been to Earth!

Or even knows Rick Jones!

Somehow, by means I don't know, this ties in with the return of Amphibion, Night-Crawler and Torgo who've been sent to Earth to recruit the comic's star on behalf of the princess he once rescued from the Galaxy-Master.

Iron Man #156

I really don't know what happens in this one but it looks like Shellhead's up against yet another armoured adversary.

I have no doubt Tony Stark's alter-ego will emerge triumphant.

Thor #317, the Man-Beast

We might have thought the Man-Beast met his demise last month but, barely have we had time to recover from that pulse-pounding battle than he's back, and out to steal a NASA rocket, so he can get back to Counter-Earth and trash the place.

Needless to say, Thor soon puts a stop to that devilish plan.

Daredevil #180

Things get seriously strange, as Daredevil discovers an entire population of cannibals living in New York's sewers.

And one of them is the Kingpin's amnesiac wife!

Above ground, it's Foggy who's got problems because Kingie's decided it's time to pay Elektra to bump off the pesky lawyer.

Captain America #267, Everyman

Cap gets down with the hood as he comes up against Everyman, a would-be urban saviour who's more interested in winning fights than he is in actually helping anyone.

The Uncanny X-Men #155

Deathbird's back!

And, this time, she's got the Brood with her.

Not that anyone, at this stage, knows who the Brood are.

For that matter, I'm not sure if the X-Men have encountered Deathbird before, either.

Anyway, it can only be trouble for the mighty mutants who've just discovered Lilandra's been kidnapped. And for Scott who must still come to terms with the fact he's no longer an orphan.

As if that's not bad enough, it looks like Colossus has bit the bullet.

Blimey. They're going to need a strong cup of tea after all that malarkey.

The Amazing Spider-Man #226 , the Black Cat returns

Catwoman The Black Cat is back.

And it can only mean trouble for Batman Spider-Man, as she goes on a spree of stealing from the mob.

The Spectacular Spider-Man #64, Cloak and Dagger

It all goes high-drama, as Cloak and Dagger are in town and out to kill the drug gang who turned them into the weirdoes they currently are.

Spidey does his best to moralise the pair into showing restraint but totally fails on that front.

Thursday 10 March 2022

March 10th 1982 - Marvel UK, 40 years ago this week.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

The solar system was suddenly looking a whole lot more lop-sided, tonight in 1982.

That's because it was the night on which all nine recognised planets found themselves aligned on the same side of the sun.

How could the galaxy survive such imbalance?

And just what did Counter-Earth make of it all?

Noticeably unperturbed by this cosmic action was the UK singles chart which showed no change at the top. Which meant Tight Fit's version of The Lion Sleeps Tonight was still sitting pretty at Number One.

And the UK LP chart was similarly unmoved, with Barbra Streisand's Love Songs retaining its iron grip on the summit.

Elsewhere on that week's singles chart, these are the songs I was approving of:

Town Called Malice/Precious - The Jam

Say Hello, Wave Goodbye - Soft Cell

Golden Brown - The Stranglers

Head Over Heels - Abba

Layla - Derek and The Dominoes

The Model/Computer Love - Kraftwerk

Tainted Love - Soft Cell

and

The Land of Make Believe - Bucks Fizz.

For any who wish to pursue the matter further, that week's singles chart can be found here.

While the associated album chart may be unearthed here.

Scooby-Doo and His TV Friends #3, Yogi Bear

But we all know what everyone really came here for.

To find out what Scooby-Doo's up to.

And it would appear he's meeting Yogi Bear, though I'm not totally sure just what's going on on that cover.

Regardless, we also get the chance to win 10 Play School annuals.

Just as long as they don't have any photos of, nightmare terror doll from Hell, Hamble in them.

Super Spider-Man TV Comic #470, King Kull

It's the team-up we all thought we'd never see.

Mostly because it makes no sense.


I've not even read it and I know it's not going to work.

And it appears Dr Strange is mixed up in it, as well.

Just to keep us extra happy, we also get a free poster of Spider-Man vs the Mud Thing which I believe is the monster created when Sandman and Hydro-Man got accidentally combined.

Captain America #55, Adonis

It's Captain America vs Adonis.

Is Adonis the one who gets himself an unstoppable robot body?

The one that Cap very quickly stops?

Meanwhile, in his strip, Iron Man's having to deal with a fire at an offshore oil rig.

And, of Thor's activities, I can say nothing.

Marvel Classics Comics #12, Moonstone

Wilkie Collins' classic The Moonstone gets the Marvel treatment.

And it's brought to us by Don McGregor and Dino Castrillo.

But, brace yourself. The big shock is that Dazzling Don's co-credited as penciller!

I don't know. Jim Shooter, Steve Englehart, Don McGregor. Are there any Marvel writers who haven't turned their hands to pencilling, at some point?

However, that's not even the most shocking news to impart about this publication, as I do believe this is the last-ever issue of this particular book.

Tuesday 8 March 2022

The Marvel Lucky Bag - March 1982.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

March 1982 was not blessed with a slew of great movie releases but the best-known of them bore such titles as Evil Under the Sun, Parasite, Victor/Victoria and Eating Raoul.

Even though I'm familiar with their titles, and some of their concepts, I don't believe I've seen any of them.

I shall, therefore, pass no judgement upon them, and leap straight into my look at what was happening with some of Marvel's less popular mags that bore that month upon their frontages.

Moon Knight #17

From what I can gather, our hero gets the chance to expose Nimrod and his organisation - but refuses.

He then unrefuses when his friend's killed by a man known as, "The Master Sniper."

Which leads him to Israel and a journey into something or other.

Marvel Fanfare #1, Spider-Man

A brand new comic's unleashed upon the world!

And, judging by that cover, so is a pterodactyl!

Or is it a pterodactyl?

It would seem Karl Lykos is alive and well in the Savage Land, and the Angel's on his tail.

But so's Peter Parker, sent there on behalf of the Daily Bugle.

However, once there, he and the Angel have to deal with the deadly menace of Brainchild.

As if that's not enough to keep us busy, we also get a back-up strip that features drug dealers and Daredevil.

Marvel Team-Up #115, Thor and Spider-Man

Thor and Spidey find themselves confronting the menace of the Mind-Bender.

Tragically, that's all I know of this issue's contents.

The Very Best of Dennis the Menace #1

I do believe Dennis the Menace already has two Marvel books of his own.

And, now, he has a third, so that we can relive his greatest adventures.

Dazzler #13, The Grapplers

I must confess Dazzler's not a comic I feel habitually drawn towards. However, this issue features a gang of villains called The Grapplers and a name like that's enough to pique even my interest.

It seems she meets them on Ryker's Island, after turning herself in, for the death of Klaw.

Still, all's well that ends well and not only does our heroine defeat the felonious females, she also clears her name, as well!

King Conan #9

I don't know what happens in this one but I know it's thirty-eight pages long.

People may not be shocked to discover it's drawn by John Buscema.

Sunday 6 March 2022

Fifty years ago today - March 1972.

Thanks to Charlie Horse 47 and Killdumpster for their sponsorship of this post, via the magic of Patreon
***

Some like to declare that things are out of this world but some things really are out of this world.

One of them is the Pioneer 10 spacecraft. I don't have a clue where it is right now but I do know that in March 1972, it was at Cape Kennedy.

However, that didn't last long because, that very month, it was launched into outer space before going on to become the first man-made object to leave the solar system.

Resolutely refusing to leave the solar system were Jethro Tull who strayed right here and released their Thick as a Brick LP. I've never heard it but it would seem it was a concept album which pretended to have been written by an 8-year-old boy called Gerald Bostock. Sounds groovy.

Rather less groovy - because it didn't need to run on grooves, unlike those pesky trams - was the last trolleybus system in the United Kingdom, located in Bradford, West Yorkshire. Sadly, March 1972 saw it close, after over 60 years of operation.

Amazing Spider-Man #106, unmasked

Can it be? Has the devious Professor Smythe managed to uncover Spider-Man's true identity, by using his army of rooftop cameras?

Yes, it can.

Fortunately, Peter Parker's trip to the rubber mask factory soon thwarts the scientist's evil scheme.

Avengers #97, Rick Jones gets super-powers

The Kree/Skrull War reaches its awesome conclusion, as Neal Adams disappears without a trace, a load of Golden Age heroes reappear and Rick Jones becomes the most powerful sidekick in the universe!

Captain America #147, Supreme Hydra unmasked

At last, the true identity of the Supreme Hydra is revealed!

It's going to be the Red Skull, isn't it?

Conan the Barbarian #14, Conan meets Elric

What's that, Skippy, Conan meets Elric of Melbourne, Australia's greatest Fantasy hero?

I do believe that Zukala and Zephra also return.

I must confess the exact plot of this tale escapes my recollection but if Ramsay Street doesn't feature, I'll be highly disappointed with them.

Daredevil #85, the Gladiator

I know nothing of this tale but, from the title, it seems the Gladiator's causing no end of trouble on a plane.

Fantastic Four #120, Airwalker

I've no problems remembering this one, as Galactus' latest herald shows up to give the Fantastic Four plenty of trouble, before turning out to be a robot.

Incredible Hulk #149, the Inheritor

The Inheritor!

Who is he?

What is he?

He's a giant cockroach who needs fresh doses of radiation to prevent him reverting to his natural form.

And that can only lead him to Project Greenskin.

And that can only lead to a punch-up with the Hulk.

Thor #197, Mangog, John Romita

Thor and the Warriors Three battle Satrina and Kartag, as Mangog lays waste to Asgard. 

Can it be the end for the Norse Gods?

And, for that matter, the end for all of us?

Iron Man #45, student protesters

I've no idea what happens in this tale but I do know I wrote a post about its cover once.

And here it is.


But that's enough about Marvel. We should never forget it has a rival. One that likes to churn out comics too.

That in mind, let's peruse a snatch of the more promising DC offerings which bear a March 1972 cover date.

It's a 100-page spectacular as Adventure Comics takes a look at the World's Greatest Super-Females.

And, so, we get a selection of tales starring Supergirl, Wonder Woman, the Black Canary, Phantom Lady and Merry the Gimmick Girl.

I don't have a clue who Merry the Gimmick Girl is.

Or just what her gimmick is.

The Brave and the Bold #100, Batman

DC's legendary team-up book hits its 100th issue and does so with a main story that involves Batman, Black Canary, Green Arrow, Green Lantern and Robin, while the back-up strip stars Deadman as presented to us by Jack Miller and Neal Adams.

The Flash #213

What's? this? the old Flash fighting the new Flash? What kind of madness is this?

On top of that, we also get a breathless adventure called Fatal Fingers of the Flash!

But why are they fatal?

I dread to think.

The Sinister House of Secret Love #3

We all know this feature wouldn't be complete without a 
spooky romance cover. And here's another one. This time, from George Ziel.

The main offering's a thing called Bride of the Falcon,  written by Frank Robbins and drawn by Alex Toth.

But there's also room for a secondary tale, Will I Ever See You Again? as brought to us by the pencil of Jack Sparling and the typewriter of an anonymous author.